Resources

Assessment of Food Security Early Warning Systems for East and Southern Africa under Reports

posted February 27, 2018, 7:03 am

Th is report presents the findings and recommendations of the regional assessment of the EWSs for enhancing food security in ESA. Th e objective of the assignment was to assess “bottlenecks” and opportunities for improving food security EWSs to enhance resilience in ESA, which comprises 25 countries and 5 African Union Regional Economic Communities (RECs).14 EWS producers and users, drawn from governmental and nongovernmental agencies as well as local communities, were consulted in 7 out of 25 countries in eastern (includes members of the East African Community [EAC] and Intergovernmental Authority for Development [IGAD]) and southern Africa (includes member states from the SADC and Indian Ocean Commission [IOC]). All members of these RECs are also members of the Common Market for East and Southern Africa (COMESA). Th e country selection criterion was based on the level of disaster risk, according to the Index for Risk Management (INFORM) classification.


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IPC South Sudan Release under Reports

posted February 27, 2018, 6:54 am

To inform decision-making, the South Sudan IPC Technical Working Group has provided population estimates in the absence of all forms of humanitarian assistance for the two projection periods (February-April and May-July 2018), while the maps factor in the planned, funded and likely humanitarian assistance for the projected period.


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FSNWG October/ November 2017 Statement under Reports

posted December 18, 2017, 10:04 am

Update on Food / Nutrition Security Situation in the Great Horn of Africa (GHA), October/ November 2017and Prospects to December 2017. An estimated 30.3 million people are facing acute food insecurity (IPC Phase 3 and above), and are in need of urgent humanitarian assistance. The main drivers include: repeated episodes of drought across the region; conflicts and insecurity; high staple food prices, high influx of refugees movement across the region and high number of IDPs. The main areas of concern are: South Sudan; Burundi; south-eastern Ethiopia; pastoral areas of Kenya, and parts of Somalia. Food security is expected to improve in equatorial region of GHA due to the normal to above normal rainfall excepted in the eastern , central and far northern parts. In Sudan, Ethiopia and Uganda in the coming months, food security is expected to improve as households harvest seasonal crops. Poor food security conditions are expected to persist in Burundi and Rwanda until the end of the lean season.


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Grain Watch Weekly under Reports

posted October 18, 2017, 7:42 am

Maize prices in Uganda are on a downtrend due to low demand. In the Eastern Border market of Busia, the price of maize eased by 14.2% (Ugx 142/Kg) with trade being sluggish due to ongoing harvest season in Western Kenya. However, in the western border markets of Kasese district, there was a significant gain of 17.1 % (Ugx 187/kg) with firm demand from the DRC. It is worth noting Kenya serves as the most significant export market for maize and beans compared to other countries. For Sorghum, there was mixed performance with Kampala declining by 5% (Ugx 58/Kg) with other markets gaining as high as 33.5% Gulu. Traders attributed the increase to tightened stocks resulting from poor harvest in the first season. Prices in Eastern markets such as Mbale, Busia, Soroti, and Tororo are expected to go down due to low demand in the coming weeks as they are integrated with Kenya markets that are currently enjoying sufficient supplies. Demand for staples has eased in the past few weeks with in bounding harvest coupled with stocks from cross-border trade in Kenya. Maize and beans prices have declined significantly, and the trend is expected to persist heading into the produce of the primary crop in North Rift later in the month. However, reports from markets indicate traders are not stocking as usual due to the political impasse witnessed in the recent past, in Nyamkima, Nairobi there was apprehension by traders as shops were operating below capacity. Prices of maize in the markets remain stable, however, typically higher in Kisumu >Kes 35/kg considering neighboring counties such as Kakamega, Migori and Bomet are harvesting. Rice prices were relatively stable as informal flows from Tanzania have eased pressure on demand with much of commodity getting to the western markets through Isebania with supply remaining steady at about 40MT per week with greater quantities coming through the Lake Victoria. Sorghum prices remain stable with adequate supply reported in most markets; in the coming weeks, prices are expected to go down as harvest intensifies in sections of North Rift.


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Food Situation Assessment and Prospects for 2017/2018 under Reports

posted October 18, 2017, 6:20 am

Food and nutrition security critical to Kenya’s economic and social well-being Kenya depend largely on her own food production in meeting the national food needs; Balance met by imports Kenya and the neighboring countries in the region experienced a devastating drought in 2016. Led to: ?Low crop production ?Food shortages ?High commodity prices ?Loss of livestock in pastoralist and agro-pastoralist areas Key lesson: Need for close and periodic monitoring of crop performance and food situation in the country


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Cost of Production for Maize & Rice in Kenya, 2017 under Reports

posted October 18, 2017, 6:16 am

Maize is the most important cereal grain in the country –65% of staple food calories (Mohajan, 2014) –40% of total crop area in Kenya (ERA, 2015) –Produced by a large majority of smallholder farmers About 80% of rice is produced under irrigation in public irrigation schemes •However, about 80% of total consumption is imported •Key constraints include: –Restricted investment in irrigation infrastructure & area under rice –Low uptake of upland rice –High capital requirement and high costs of credit


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East Africa Regional Seasonal Calendar under Crop Calendar

posted October 18, 2017, 6:07 am

Food Security & Nutrition Working Group Central & Eastern Africa - FSNWG East Africa Regional Seasonal Calendar


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EAST AFRICA CROSSBORDER TRADE BULLETIN OCTOBER 2017 VOLUME XVIIII under Reports

posted October 18, 2017, 5:51 am

The Market Analysis Sub-group of the Food Security and Nutrition Working Group (FSNWG) monitors informal cross-border trade of 88 food commodities and livestock in eastern Africa in order to quantify the impact on regional food security. This bulletin summarizes informal trade across selected borders of Tanzania, Burundi, Rwanda, Uganda, Kenya, Somalia, Djibouti, Ethiopia, Sudan, and South Sudan and DRC. Data is provided by the East Africa Grain Council (EAGC), the Famine Early Warning Systems Network (FEWS NET), the Food and Agricultural Organization of the United Nations (FAO), the National Bank of Rwanda (NBR) and the World Food Program (WFP). Informal trade represents commodity flows outside of the formal system, meaning that activity is not typically recorded in government statistics or inspected and taxed through official channels. These flows vary from very small quantities moved by bicycle to large volumes trucked over long distances. This report does not capture all informal cross-border trade in the region, just a representative sample.


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EAST AFRICA CROSSBORDER TRADE BULLETIN JULY 2017 VOLUME XVIII under Reports

posted August 17, 2017, 7:06 am

The Market Analysis Sub-group of the Food Security and Nutrition Working Group (FSNWG) monitors informal cross-border trade of 88 food commodities and livestock in eastern Africa in order to quantify the impact on regional food security. This bulletin summarizes informal trade across selected borders of Tanzania, Burundi, Rwanda, Uganda, Kenya, Somalia, Djibouti, Ethiopia, Sudan, and South Sudan and DRC. Data is provided by the East Africa Grain Council (EAGC), the Famine Early Warning Systems Network (FEWS NET), the Food and Agricultural Organization of the United Nations (FAO), the National Bank of Rwanda (NBR) and the World Food Program (WFP). Informal trade represents commodity flows outside of the formal system, meaning that activity is not typically recorded in government statistics or inspected and taxed through official channels. These flows vary from very small quantities moved by bicycle to large volumes trucked over long distances. This report does not capture all informal cross-border trade in the region, just a representative sample.


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